News

Sanyou News
Industry News
  • 新浪微博
  • 微信扫一扫关注币安app官网下载地址

News

Can China get the world to 80% renewables by 2050?

Update:2014-05-16Clicks:292

The latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have reiterated the call for 80% of our electricity supplies to come from low-carbon energy by 2050. WWF also released a report this year claiming 80% of China’s power could come from renewables by this date, setting an example for the rest of the world.

As energy ministers from around the world meet in Seoul to discuss the advancement of clean energy, we asked a group of experts what China can play in the global renewables market – and how seriously to take these figures.

Lin Boqiang, Center of China Energy Economics Research, Xiamen University:

The target for renewables to account for 80% of electricity generated in 2050 is basically impossible for China. Renewables, including hydropower, currently account for less than 20% of China’s electricity generation. How can we grow this to 80% of the total?

China has seen such incredible growth in renewables because this has been an unusual period, not because of attempts to grow the solar sector. First, EU anti-dumping measures targeting solar-power products provided an opportunity for the domestic market to grow. Without that, we wouldn’t have seen such expansion. Second, growth has been so rapid because we’re starting from a small base – it won’t grow so fast in the future. Third, air pollution has forced China to cut coal use. This period has seen a number of special, but unsustainable, policies: subsidies for solar power won’t last forever.

Also, before we bet on renewables, we need to look at the reality of the costs. First, what are the social costs of abandoning existing coal-power plants? We have 860 gigawatts of coal power in operation. That’s locked in for the next three decades at least. Second, what are the new costs of using renewables? Currently we only discuss the electricity generating costs, but there are also increases in operational costs. The grid will need storage and back-up generating capacity, as solar and wind aren’t stable sources of power. If these account for such a high proportion of total power, the costs of coping with unusual circumstances will also be higher.

The US is much more powerful than China, but it hasn’t achieved this goal. This shows the uncertainties of developing renewables. The market is the best proof – the price of oil hasn’t plummeted.

Overall, I find it difficult to believe that renewables can account for 80% of all electricity generation. The assumptions used by WWF would be very hard to realise. I believe that for some time to come China will draw power mainly from coal, for two reasons. One, we have coal – it is our only strength. Second, it’s cheap and everything else is expensive. As long as smog levels are acceptable, we’ll choose coal.

Ella Chou, investment advisory firm MingX:

To meet the 80% renewables goal by 2050, China would have to play its role in the global renewable industry not just as a manufacturer and consumer, but as an energy innovator. China’s juggernaut capacity in solar and wind manufacturing has been the focus of the world’s attention and several trade cases. Since 2008, China has been the largest solar-panel producer in the world. In 2012, China produced 27% of the world’s polysilicon, 80% of the world’s wafers, 66% of C-Si cells and 69% of C-Si modules. China was the largest producer of wind towers in 2011, and produces approximately 25% of the wind turbine rotor blades. It is the world’s largest and fastest-growing market for renewables, according to the US Energy Information Administration, boasting an added capacity of 16.1 gigawatts of wind and 12 gigawatts of solar in 2013 alone, putting the cumulative capacity of wind to 91.4 gigawatts, and solar to 20.3 gigawatts.

Yet the most crucial thing to watch is whether China can move up the value chain and become a major energy innovator. To some extent, this is already happening. According to the World Intellectual Property Organization, China has logged more renewable energy patents per year than the European Patent Office, and is growing much faster than any other nation. More cumulative patents related to wind and solar technologies have been filed in China than in any other nation. This is by no means to say China is already an energy innovator, yet the country is on the right direction by promoting renewable energy market growth. Efforts to ease renewable financing, promote “green credit”, simplify administrative procedures, and change the government cadre performance evaluation mechanism to make the environment a higher priority would allow for robust renewable market growth. This stimulates innovation even more than publicly funded research and development over long periods of time.

Source: Chinadialogue